Crafting my way into the hearts of young people

I spent last weekend chaperoning a group of girls from my old church at camp.  Probably the worst part of moving was leaving behind that congregation, because they were there for the vast majority of my formative years and are therefore family.  By that measure, the girls are effectively my little sisters, and what do you do when you’ve spent too much time away from favored young’uns?  You bring them presents, of course!

In all honesty, this started out with a request from one of them last year to make this Pichu Plush, and I just wound up taking so long to finish it that I figured I’d wait and give it to her in person rather than shipping it around Christmas.  But then I had to come up with something for the other two, because it wouldn’t be fair to have something for just one of them. 

Shucks!  I had to make more cute things for people I love.

I gave the Pichu project a little extra challenge: I did not allow myself to diverge from the pattern at all.  It was shockingly difficult, given my propensity for ad-libbing more or less every project I touch, regardless of the quality of the original pattern.

Here is the finished Pichu, in all it’s adorable-ness:

You know you’ve done it right when you look at the unattached, unadorned head mid-assembly and have a sudden attack of Cute.

Now for the other two munchkins…

Munchkin #2 has had a long-standing love for all things Star Wars (I trained her well), and has yet to grow out of it.  Several years ago I made her an amigurumi Yoda, so I thought she needed another beloved character:

Chewbacca!

Yes, I finally managed to crochet something with eyelash yarn.  I don’t think that will ever be happening again.

The third and final munchkin and I have this ongoing joke about finger puppets that came in a book of crochet patterns she gave me a couple of years ago.  There is a set of four patterns: a witch, a wizard, a white owl and… a baby walrus.

Yeah, one of these things is not like the others – unless it is a magical baby walrus, which… clearly, it must be.

Anyway, I made her the walrus for her birthday last year, so I figured he needed some other animal friends to keep him company:

I finished the finger puppets while I was in Houston with my sister-in-law and niece, and of course my niece took an instant shining to the bird, so I made one more before I left for camp:

She naturally came up with a fun new game for it immediately:

Watch [mommy, grandpa, grandma, auntie] wiggle the bird.  Grab for the bird.  Pull the bird off the wiggling finger.  Drop the bird on the floor.  Watch [mommy, grandpa, grandma, auntie] pick the bird up off the floor.  Repeat.

It is a very good thing this child is so freakishly cute, because she is evil.

…and I am so proud.

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Suffering for Artistic Integrity

Don’t Quit Your Day Job

 

Seriously – the stuff gets all tangled on itself if you look at it wrong.  But the doll is going to a very dear young friend of mine, so it has to be done.

Touched by his noodly appendage, or just touched in the head?

As Dear Roommie sits weeping over creepy pictures of Justin Bieber on the internet (it’s really best not to ask), I have at long last finished the next entry in my new line of Very Silly Mythical Creature Hats:

The Flying Spaghetti Monster!

I may have finally out-sillied myself.

The tentacles are made using basically the same principal as the Secret Santa Squid. Everything else is pretty self-explanatory. Eye stalks are crocheted in the round, meatballs are uncut pom-poms.

The sad part is how many tries it took to get the bottom part finished.  Because it’s not intended for arctic winters, I had to find a way to keep it relatively open, so half the bottom is an open mesh pattern, then the last part that flips up is a single crochet made with a size N (as in, “No really, I want a HUGE stitch!”) hook.

Fortunately, I have a very good idea what I’ll be doing with this one.  If offers made at ultimate frisbee parties still stand two weeks later, I have a buyer for this bit of ridiculousness.

Iä! Iä! Cthulhu Fhtagn!

Inspired by the Magical Pink Unicorn Hat, I have continued making very silly mythical creature hats.  This week’s feature:  CTHULU!

Though, as happens when I crochet Cthulu-themed things, it’s more of a Cute-thulu.

 

Anyway, it’s an adorable hat with the beady, soul-sucking eyes and itty-bitty tentacles, but I’m wildly pleased with the base design, and intend to make some saner hats based on the same pattern.

If nothing else, it’s a lot less complicated than the damned unicorn…

Magical Pink Unicorn… HAT!

So the climax of the nasty winter weather in my part of the universe hit Thursday night, and in the course of just a few hours, my Friday plans went from awesome!!!! to… uhh… nothing.  Nothing at all, because an inch of very wet snow fell overnight and then it stayed below freezing all day, so nothing thawed, and central Texans do not know how to deal with frozen precipitation that actually sticks around past sunrise.

So what did I do with my new found spare time?  Well obviously, I slept in.  Then I spent the entire day in my pajamas and under a blanket-burrow on Boy’s couch, watching most of a season of Farscape and… creating.

What did I make?

I made… well… I made this:

It’s a hat, you see.

Where did I come up with such a monstrous idea?

The idea is lovingly ganked from one D. Corsetto, creator of Girls With Slingshots.  Back in December, one of her main characters was gifted with an over-sized pink unicorn hat

…and upon reading this comic I instantly knew that I would have to make one of my very own.  This is not so much about the fashion statement as the challenge.

It came out looking kind of piggy, and my decision not to stuff the horn has resulted in some vaguely obscene shapes when it bends.  However, this is one of those rare projects where the dumber it looks, the better, so I’ve just been enjoying the freedom to be ridiculous.

Mechanically, I just tried to keep everything as simple as possible.  I wasted a few hours trying to do something fancy with the main body of the hat and the ear flaps.  Then I realized that that was stupid and went back to a very simple design.  After that, everything else was treated as an independent unit, created and shaped separately and stitched on at the end.  Looking at the final product, I am mightily proud of my monstrous creation.

The next obvious question is what to do with the thing now that it’s done.

Frankly, I have no idea.